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Breast Cancer

Breast Ca Screening for Older Women = High Cost But No Benefit

Medicare spending on breast cancer screening increased substantially between 2001 and 2009 but the detection rates of early stage tumors were unchanged, according to a study done at Yale and published July 16th 2014 in the JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

A release from the publisher notes that the effect of the introduction of new breast cancer screening modalities such as digital images, computer-aided detection (CAD), and use of ultrasound and MRI on screening costs among older women is unknown, although women over the age of 65 represent almost one-third of the total women screened in the US annually. There is conflicting evidence regarding benefit of screening for older women and newer modalities have not been in use long enough to establish a relationship between these new modalities and breast cancer mortality.

Brigid K. Killelea, M.D. M.P.H., from Department of Surgery and Cary P. Gross, M.D., of the Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy and Effectiveness Research (COPPER) Center at the Yale Cancer Center and Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, and colleagues investigated changes in breast cancer screening and associated costs among elderly women in the US and analyzed changes in cancer stage and incidence rates. Using data from the SEER-Medicare linked database, they created two cohorts of women: a cohort of 137,150 women screened between 2001 and 2002 (before the introduction of new screening modalities), and a cohort of 133,097 women screened between 2008 and 2009 (after the introduction of new screening modalities).

They observed that while overall screening rates remained stable, the use of digital image acquisition and CAD increased. At the national level, there was a substantial increase in screening-related costs in the Medicare program ($666 million to $962 million), although a statistically significant change in detection rates of early stage tumors was not observed.

The authors conclude, “Longer follow-up data with regard to stage-specific incidence, cost, and patient reported experiences relating to both screening and treatment are needed in order to inform decisions about screening Medicare beneficiaries for breast cancer.”

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