Caregiving

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Caregiving

5 Questions About Long-Distance Caregiving

Posted by Sondra Forsyth Sondra Forsyth

What is long-distance caregiving? It can be helping Aunt Lilly sort through her medical bills or thinking about how to make the most of a weekend visit with Mom. It can include checking the references of an aide who’s been hired to help your grandfather or trying to take the pressure off your sister who lives in the same town as both your aging parents and her aging in-laws. Here, from the National Institute on Aging, are the answers to five key questions about long-distance caregiving:

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Caregiving

Daughters, Not Sons, Are the Caregivers

Posted by Sondra Forsyth Sondra Forsyth

Researchers at Princeton University found women appear to provide as much elderly parent care as they can, while men contribute as little as possible. The study was presented in August 2014 at at the 109th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association in San Francisco.

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Caregiving

Managing Dementia Related Personality Changes

Posted by Sondra Forsyth Sondra Forsyth

Alzheimer’s disease causes brain cells to die, so the brain works less well over time. This changes how a person acts. Here, from the National Institute on Aging, are suggestions that may help you understand and cope with changes in personality and behavior in a person with Alzheimer’s disease. Common personality and behavior changes you may see include: • Getting upset, worried, and angry more easily • Acting depressed or not interested in things • Hiding things or believing other people are hiding things

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Caregiving

Telephone Support Helps Dementia Caregivers

Posted by Sondra Forsyth

Rhode Island Hospital researchers have found that a support program administered entirely by telephone can significantly reduce depression and other symptoms in informal caregivers, such as family or friends, of individuals with dementia. The study was published in July 2014 online in advance of print in the journal Alzheimer's & Dementia.

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Aging Well
Caregiving

3 Tips for Choosing an Assisted-Living Home
 for Your Parents

Posted by Peder Johnson

By Peder Johnsen Seventy percent of people age 65 and older will need long-term care at some point in their lives, according to a 2014 study by CareScout, a division of Genworth Financial Services. But that doesn’t mean they have to sacrifice quality of life. In fact, a person who needs some assistance with day-to-day living will often find he or she is much happier in a good assisted-living community with an atmosphere that reminds them of their former home.

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Caregiving

Professional Post-Stroke Care From Head to Toe

Posted by Marki Flannery

By Marki Flannery At the end of nurse Lorraine Williams' recent home care visit to Professor Samuel Kaplan, he walked her to the apartment's front door. "I was so surprised," she marvels. Only a year earlier, the 70-something professor had a stroke and couldn't walk.

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Aging Well
Caregiving
Medical Care

Long-Term Care Must Be Improved

Posted by Sondra Forsyth

As millions of Americans struggle to help loved ones with dementia, policymakers should consider more ways to improve long-term services and supports for the soaring numbers of people with the debilitating condition and their caregivers, according to a new RAND Corporation study done in June 2014. Thereport also offers possible ways to achieve those goals.

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Caregiving

Synching Info Between Homes & Hospitals

Posted by Sondra Forsyth

Researchers at the University of Missouri in Columbia are working to develop an in-home health monitoring and alert system that streams patients’ individualized health information between homes and hospitals. The system’s ability to provide comprehensive health information could lead to better care for patients as well as reduced costs for individuals and health systems.

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Caregiving

Early Palliative Support Helps Cancer Caregivers

Posted by Sondra Forsyth Sondra Forsyth

Dartmouth researchers have found that those caring for patients with advanced cancer experienced reduced depression and felt less burdened by caregiving tasks when palliative support services were offered soon after the patient's diagnosis. The team presented the findings at the American Society of Clinical Oncologist (ASCO) annual meeting in Chicago on June 3rd 2014.