Caregiving

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Caregiving

How to Avoid Financial Ruin as a Caregiver

Posted by Hilary Young

By Hilary Young A shrinking middle class, medical expenses at an all-time high and a caregiver shortage: it’s the perfect cocktail for financial ruin. And now a new study from researchers with the Faculty of Social Work at the University of Calgary in Alberta, Canada has found that women in particular are more susceptible to going bankrupt when caring for an elderly parent.

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Caregiving

Aging in Place: The “Granny Pods” Trend

Posted by Hilary Young

By Hilary Young According to the American Association of Retired Persons, over 80 percent of adults now intend to age in place. Nursing homes are no longer the norm. Many seniors prefer to stay active and remain independent for as long as possible. One major trend that is helping to make this wish come true is the proliferation of transitional housing options, otherwise known as “Granny Pods.”

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Caregiving

Adult Day Care A Boon for Caregivers

Posted by Sondra Forsyth

Family caregivers show an increase in the beneficial stress hormone DHEA-S on days when they use an adult day care service for their relatives with dementia, according to researchers at Penn State and the University of Texas at Austin. A release from Penn explains that DHEA-S controls the harmful effects of cortisol and is associated with better long-term health.

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Caregiving

Caregiving Challenges: Bathing and Personal Hygiene

Posted by Diane Blum

By Diane Blum As Alzheimer’s progresses, poor hygiene can often become more than just an unpleasant issue. It can have medical consequences, such as bacterial infections including UTIs. Gastroenteritis and other health issues can also occur, some quite serious to an immune system weakened as Alzheimer’s progresses.

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Caregiving

Peace of Mind for Long-Distance Caregivers

Posted by Marki Flannery

By Marki Flannery Every Sunday, Donna placed a call from her home in Washington D.C. to her Aunt Catherine, to check up on her. At age 87, Catherine lived alone in her longtime Lower Manhattan apartment and, except for an attack of angina a couple years ago, was in relatively good health. Donna asked, as she usually did, about her aunt's weekend and was heartened to hear she had gotten out with friends. "My neighbor's daughter took us to the Metropolitan Museum," Catherine said, sounding uplifted.