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Creative Activities Boost Job Performance

When the workday ends, do you turn to a favorite creative activity such as painting with water colors, writing poetry, making up new recipes, or planting and tending a beautiful flower garden? If so, you’re probably boosting your performance on the job. That’s the finding of a study done by San Francisco State University organizational psychologist Kevin Eschleman and colleagues that was reported in the Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology in April 2014.

A release from the university explains that the study examined whether creative activity might have an indirect impact on employees' performance by providing them with a way to recover from the demands of their job, by restoring them through relaxation, increasing their sense of control, or challenging them to learn new skills that can be transferable to the job. However, the findings suggest that creative activity also seems to improve job performance outside of its effect on these traditional types of recovery.

The release quotes Eschleman as sying, "It can be rare in research to find that what we do in our personal time is related to our behaviors in the workplace, and not just how we feel."

The employees in the study were free to define creative activities however they wished. In previous studies, Eschleman noted, people say they spend creative time doing everything from writing short stories to playing video games.

Despite this diversity, "they usually describe it as lush, as a deep experience that provides a lot of things for them. But they also talk about this idea of self-expression and an opportunity to really discover something about themselves, and that isn't always captured with the current recovery experience models."

The study included data on 341 employees from a major national survey who answered questions about their creative activities, recovery experiences like taking charge of their downtime schedules, and their own ratings of how creative they had been on the job and how they had supported their organization and coworkers.

It also included a second group of 92 active duty U.S. Air Force captains, who were surveyed on similar items about creative activity and recovery but were evaluated on their job performances by coworkers and subordinates.

Many studies of recovery have focused on employees working in notably stressful jobs in healthcare and the military, said Eschleman, who worked as a civilian researcher with the Air Force before coming to SF State. But he cautioned that the need for recovery is something that all employees may face at different times, during quarterly deadlines or organizational changes, for instance.

Eschleman said that employers can encourage their employees to engage in more creative activities outside work, but the encouragement has to strike the right tone.

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