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Free Radicals May Be Good Guys After All

Free radicals, the sometimes-toxic molecules produced by our bodies as we process oxygen, have received a lot of bad press claiming that they are they are the culprits behind aging. Yet a number of studies have found evidence that the opposite may be true. Most recently, researchers at McGill University in Montreal have shown that free radicals promote longevity in the roundworm C. elegans. Surprisingly, the team discovered that free radicals – also known as oxidants – act on a molecular mechanism that, in other circumstances, tells a cell to kill itself. (Does this mean that the common recommendation to eat foods with antioxidants is wrog? Th jury is still out on that issue so don't use this study as an excuse to skip your fruits and veggies! )

A release from the university explains that programmed cell death, or apoptosis, is a process by which damaged cells commit suicide in a variety of situations: to avoid becoming cancerous, to avoid inducing auto-immune disease, or to kill off viruses that have invaded the cell. The main molecular mechanism by which this happens is well conserved in all animals, but was first discovered in C. elegans – a discovery that resulted in a Nobel Prize.

The McGill researchers found that this same mechanism, when stimulated in the right way by free radicals, actually reinforces the cell's defenses and increases its lifespan. Their findings are reported in a study published online May 8th 2014 in the journal Cell.

The release quotes senior author Siegfried Hekimi, a professor in McGill's Department of Biology, as saying, "People believe that free radicals are damaging and cause aging, but the so-called 'free radical theory of aging' is incorrect. We have turned this theory on its head by proving that free radical production increases during aging because free radicals actually combat – not cause – aging. In fact, in our model organism we can elevate free radical generation and thus induce a substantially longer life."

The findings have important implications. "Showing the actual molecular mechanisms by which free radicals can have a pro-longevity effect provides strong new evidence of their beneficial effects as signaling molecules", Hekimi says. "It also means that apoptosis signaling can be used to stimulate mechanisms that slow down aging. Since the mechanism of apoptosis has been extensively studied in people, because of its medical importance in immunity and in cancer, a lot of pharmacological tools already exist to manipulate apoptotic signaling. But that doesn't mean it will be easy."

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