126853415.jpg

Magnet Hospitals = Higher Quality of Care

The Magnet Recognition Program operated by the American Nurses Credentialing Center, which recognizes healthcare organizations that provide excellence in nursing. Now a study done at New York University College of Nursing and the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, published in March 2014 in the Journal of Nursing Administration, provide insight on the factors contributing to the differences between Magnet and Non-Magnet hospitals as well as an analysis of the links between Magnet Recognition and better nurse-reported quality of care.

A release from New York University notes that Mmagnet recognition is considered a leading source for measuring organizational success in nursing. Magnet hospitals show higher job satisfaction and lower odds of patient mortality than non-Magnet hospitals. However, only nine percent of American hospitals are recognized as Magnet. Currently, there is little research into the causes of the differences between Magnet and non-Magnet hospitals, research that could create an infrastructure for positive change in nurse and patient outcomes.

The releas quotes Amy Witkoski Stimpfel, PhD, RN, as saying, "Many of the recent efforts to improve quality and enhance transparency in healthcare have been dominated by physician services and medical outcomes.Our study shows that the overall quality of patient care can be optimized when nurses work in a positive environment, with adequate resources and support at the organizational level."

The study, "Understanding the Role of the Professional Practice Environment on Quality of Care in Magnet and Non-Magnet Hospitals," focused on cross-sectional data, including the American Hospital Association's annual survey, as well as an analysis of 56 Magnet and 495 non-Magnet hospitals. Carefully balancing variables in order to remove the maximum bias, Dr. Witkoski Stimpfel's team found a clear positive correlation between positive nurses work environments and nurse-reported quality of care. Even after taking into consideration hospital characteristic differences between Magnet and Non-Magnet hospitals, Magnet hospitals were still positively correlated with higher reports of excellent quality of care.

"Having visible and accessible chief nurses, encouraging and including nurses in decision making in their unit and throughout the organization, supporting nursing practice and engaging in interdisciplinary patient care, are but a few examples of readily modifiable features of a hospital," Dr. Witkoski Stimpfel. "Because all organizations, Magnet and otherwise, have the potential to enrich their practice environment, every organization stands to benefit from improving the organization of nursing care."

logo

The latest for the greatest!

Get up-to-the-moment health + wellness info
  right to your inbox, plus exclusive offers!