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Pain Management

No Evidence Opioids Are Effective for Chronic Pain

A National Institutes of Health white paper that was published in the Annals of Internal Medicine in January 2015 reported little to no evidence for the effectiveness of opioid drugs in the treatment of long-term chronic pain, despite the explosive recent growth in the use of the drugs.

A release from the University of Connecticut notes that the paper, which constitutes the final report of a seven-member panel convened by the NIH in September 2014, finds that many of the studies used to justify the prescription of these drugs were either poorly conducted or of an insufficient duration.

That finding makes prolific use of these drugs surprising, says Dr. David Steffens, chair of the psychiatry department at UConn Health and one of the authors of the study. When it comes to long-term pain, he says, “there’s no research-based evidence that these medicines are helpful.”

Yet despite this, prescriptions for opioid drugs (also known as opiate drugs; the two terms are technically distinct, but most physicians use them interchangeably) have more than tripled in the past 20 years, with more than 219 million prescriptions written in 2011, according to the study.

At the same time, the abuse of these drugs has also skyrocketed, leading some to refer to prescription drug abuse as an epidemic. More than 16,000 people died from prescription opioid overdoses in 2012, according to the Centers for Disease Control, and drug overdose now causes more deaths than motor vehicle accidents for people ages 25-64.

This level of opioid use and abuse is unprecedented in the world: the United States, with just 4.6 percent of the world’s population, consumes 80 percent of the world’s opioid drugs. That, says Steffens, makes this “a peculiarly American problem.”

Steffens, like the other members of the panel, was surprised by many of these findings, since he is not an expert in opioid drugs, in drug abuse, or in pain management. The members of the panel were experienced clinicians with expertise in other areas; Steffens‘ specialty is geriatric psychiatry. The release quotes Steffens as saying, “The NIH intentionally invited people from other fields of medicine in order to avoid potential conflicts of interest, and to get a fresh perspective on the issue.”

Over two days, the panel listened to evidence presented by an outside agency, which had conducted an exhaustive search of all the available studies about the use of opioid drugs. The panel’s draft report was made available for public comment in the fall of 2014. Steffens notes that one of the great challenges in grappling with this issue is the fact that opioid drugs clearly are an effective treatment for some people dealing with pain, but it is hard to predict where trouble will crop up. Part of the problem, he points out, is the need for better communication about best practices to physicians who are prescribing these drugs.

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