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Brain Health

Seeing the Inner Workings of the Brain

A team of scientists at Stanford University has improved a technique called CLARITY that they developed in 2013 to look into brains from deceased donors, according to a paper published June 19th 2014 in Nature Protocols. A release from the university explains that without this tool, the fatty outer covering of the brain’s nerve cells blocks microscopes from taking images of the intricate connections between deep brain cells. CLARITY eliminates the fatty covering while keeping the brain intact with all its intricate inner wiring.

Karl Deisseroth, a Stanford professor of bioengineering and of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and colleagues believe this paper may be the first to be published with support of the White House BRAIN Initiative, announced last year with the ambitious goal of mapping the brain’s trillions of nerve connections

“This work shares the spirit of the BRAIN Initiative goal of building new technologies to understand the brain – including the human brain,” said Deisseroth, who is also a Stanford Bio-X affiliated faculty member.

The way Deisseroth and his team eliminated the fat was to build a gel within the intact brain that held all the structures and proteins in place. They then used an electric field to pull out the fat layer that had been dissolved in an electrically charged detergent, leaving behind all the brain’s structures embedded in the firm water-based gel, or hydrogel. This is called electrophoretic CLARITY.

The electric field aspect was a challenge for some labs. “About half the people who tried it got it working right away,” Deisseroth said, “but others had problems with the voltage damaging tissue.” Deisseroth said that this kind of challenge is normal when introducing new technologies.

To help expand the use of CLARITY, the team devised an alternate way of pulling out the fat from the hydrogel-embedded brain – a technique they call passive CLARITY. It takes a little longer, but still removes all the fat, is much easier, and does not pose a risk to the tissue. “Electrophoretic CLARITY is important for cases where speed is critical, and for some tissues,” Deisseroth said.. “But passive CLARITY is a crucial advance for the community, especially for neuroscience.”
Many groups have begun to apply CLARITY to probe brains donated from people who had diseases like epilepsy or autism, which might have left clues in the brain to help scientists understand and eventually treat the disease. Yet scientists, including Deisseroth, had been wary of trying electrophoretic CLARTY on these valuable clinical samples with even a very low risk of damage. “It’s a rare and precious donated sample, you don’t want to have a chance of damage or error,” Deisseroth said. “Now the risk issue is addressed, and on top of that you can get the data very rapidly.”

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