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Breast Cancer

Some Cancers Respond to Anti-Inflammatory Drugs

Research done at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis raises the possibility that some cancer patients with aggressive tumors may benefit from a class of anti-inflammatory drugs used to treat rheumatoid arthritis. The investigators published their findings in a 2014 issue of the journal Cell Reports.

A release from the university reports that the team studied triple-negative breast cancer and found that some aggressive tumors rely on an antiviral pathway that appears to drive inflammation, widely recognized for roles in cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, and other inflammatory diseases.

The tumors that activate this particular antiviral pathway always have dysfunctional forms of the proteins p53 and ARF, both encoded by genes known for being highly mutated in various cancers. The investigators found that the two genes compensate for each other. If both are mutated, the tumors that form are more aggressive than if only one of these genes is lost.

When both genes are lost and the antiviral pathway is activated, patients may benefit from a class of anti-inflammatory drugs called JAK inhibitors, currently prescribed for rheumatoid arthritis.
Until now, even though ARF was known to be expressed in some tumors with mutated p53, ARF largely was thought to be nonfunctional in this scenario. But the investigators showed that in the absence of p53, ARF actually protects against even more aggressive tumor formation.

The release quotes senior author Jason D. Weber, PhD, associate professor of medicine, as saying, “It’s probably inaccurate to say that ARF completely replaces p53, which is a robust tumor suppressor with multiple ways of working. But it appears the cell has set up a sort of backup system with ARF. It’s not surprising that these are the two most highly mutated tumor suppressors in cancer. Because they’re backing one another up, the most aggressive tumors form when you lose both.”

Weber and his colleagues studied triple-negative breast cancer because these tumors often show mutations in both p53 and ARF. Triple-negative breast tumors are treated with surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation since targeted therapies commonly used against hormone-driven breast cancers are not effective.

In a finding Weber called surprising, the researchers showed that most triple-negative tumors lacking p53 and ARF turn on a pathway involved in the innate immune response to viral infection.

“It’s not the level of activation you would see in a true antiviral response, but it’s higher than normal,” Weber said. “We are interested in studying whether this antiviral response is creating a local environment of inflammation that supports more aggressive tumors.”

Weber and his colleagues knew that a signaling protein family known as JAK is upstream of the antiviral pathway they showed to be driving tumor growth.

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