Understanding Diabetes in Dogs

Researchers are drawing closer to an explanation of canine diabetes, a little-understood but serious condition.

Their continuing investigation could eventually lead to insights about treating humans with diabetes.

Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania and Baylor College of Medicine have used advanced imaging technology to precisely quantified the dramatic loss of insulin-producing beta cells in dogs with the disease and compared it to the loss observed in people with type 1 diabetes.

“The architecture of the canine pancreas has never been studied in the detail that we have done in this paper,” said Rebecka Hess, professor of internal medicine at Penn’s School of Veterinary Medicine and an author on the study.

The findings were published in PLOS One.

The research was led by Emily Shields, currently a graduate student in Penn’s Perelman School of Medicine, who completed much of the work as a high school and then college student in labs at Penn and Baylor. Jake A. Kushner, formerly of Penn and now McNair Medical Institute Scholar and chief of pediatric diabetes and endocrinology at Baylor College of Medicine, was senior author. Together with Hess, they collaborated with Penn Vet’s Thomas J. Van Winkle, Matthew M. Rankin of Penn Medicine and Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and Baylor’s Carol J. Lam and Aaron R. Cox.

Canine diabetes can be managed with insulin, similar to type 1 diabetes in humans. But, unlike the human version of the disease, dogs typically develop diabetes in middle or old age, while people with type 1 diabetes are typically diagnosed during childhood. In addition, while type 1 diabetes is known to be an autoimmune condition, researchers haven’t found conclusive evidence that the same is true in dogs.

To learn more about the factors that contribute to canine diabetes, the researchers made use of a repository of donated tissue samples from dogs — 23 with diabetes and 17 without — who had been treated at Penn Vet’s Ryan Hospital.

According to a news release from Penn, the team used robotic microscopes that can rapidly move around a slide taking images of pancreas tissue samples, which were analyzed by computer to determine the contents.

“In a larger view we could look at the entire cross-section of pancreas to determine how many islets there were and how big they were,” Shields said. “Then we could zoom in to differentiate beta cells, which produce insulin, from alpha cells, which produce glucagon.”


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