Aging Well

As we grow old, aging gracefully is the goal. From emotional to physical health, make sure you are ready for senior living.

Aging Well
Brain Health

Right Brain Stays Youthful as We Age

article

At least one part of the human brain appears to be able to process information the same way in older age as it does in the prime of life, according to research conducted at the University of Adelaide in Australia and presented at the 12th International Cognitive Neuroscience Conference in Brisbane in July 2014.

Aging Well
Senior Health

Longer Lives, Fewer Age-Related Illnesses

article

Living long and well may eventually be more possible, thanks to a surprise result of the work of scientists at The Wistar Institute in Philadelphia. While developing a new cancer drug, the researchers discovered that mice lacking a specific protein live longer lives with fewer age-related illnesses. The mice, which lack the TRAP-1 protein, demonstrated less age-related tissue degeneration, obesity, and spontaneous tumor formation when compared to normal mice. The teams findings could change how scientists view the metabolic networks within cells.

Aging Well
Caregiving

3 Tips for Choosing an Assisted-Living Home
 for Your Parents

article

By Peder JohnsenSeventy percent of people age 65 and older will need long-term care at some point in their lives, according to a 2014 study by CareScout, a division of Genworth Financial Services. But that doesn’t mean they have to sacrifice quality of life. In fact, a person who needs some assistance with day-to-day living will often find he or she is much happier in a good assisted-living community with an atmosphere that reminds them of their former home.

Aging Well

Life Expectancy Gains Threatened

article

A study by researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health finds that the more ailments you have after retirement age, the shorter your life expectancy. The analysis, one of the first to examine the burden of multiple chronic conditions on life expectancy among the elderly, may help explain why increases in life expectancy among older Americans are slowing.A report on the findings, based on an analysis of 1.4 million Medicare enrollees, appears in the August 2014 issue of the journal Medical Care.

Aging Well

There’s No Place Like Home – For Growing Old

article

“The stairs are getting so hard to climb.” “Since my wife died, I just open a can of soup for dinner.” “I’ve lived here 40 years. No other place will seem like home.”These are common issues for older people. And, you may share the often-heard wish—“I want to stay in my own home!” The good news is that with the right help you might be able to do just that.

Aging Well
Brain Health

A New Look at Cognition & Aging

article

From a cognitive perspective, aging is typically associated with decline. As we age, it may get harder to remember names and dates, and it may take us longer to come up with the right answer to a question. However, the news isn't all bad when it comes to cognitive aging. according to a set of three articles in the July 2014 issue of Perspectives in Psychological Science.

Aging Well
Exercise

More of Us Are Exercising This Year!

article

The 2014 United States of Aging Survey found that 37% Americans 60 and older say they exercise every day, compared with 26% in 2013. Maybe all those reports about how “sitting is the new smoking” are motivating us! Even so, we can do better. Almost 2/3 of us are still not living lives that are active enough to promote good physical and emotional health. Yet older adults who do exercise daily are much more likely than those who never exercise to say the past year of their life has been better than normal.

Aging Well

Testing Competency of Aging Drivers

article

As the American population continues to age, using tests to evaluate competency behind the wheel is critical. However, research done at the University of Colorado School of Medicine in Denver found “significant barriers to evaluations important to the continued safety and competency of older drivers” according to a release from the university. The study was published 2014 in the journal Occupational Therapy in Health Care.

Aging Well

A Drug to Slow Aging

article

A drug called rapimycin may mimic the effect of dietary restriction, one of the most-researched methods for slowing the aging process, according to an article published in The Journals of Gerontology, Series A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences/em> in June 2014.

Aging Well
Caregiving
Medical Care

Long-Term Care Must Be Improved

article

As millions of Americans struggle to help loved ones with dementia, policymakers should consider more ways to improve long-term services and supports for the soaring numbers of people with the debilitating condition and their caregivers, according to a new RAND Corporation study done in June 2014. Thereport also offers possible ways to achieve those goals.

Aging Well

Needed: Activity Apps for Older Adults

article

Commercially available activity-monitoring apps, Web sites, and wearable devices allow for easy self-management of health and wellness. This technology may be particularly helpful for older adults, who can improve their cognitive function through proper diet and exercise. However, in spite of the growing popularity of and potential benefits of tracking monitors, product designers rarely consider those over 65 to be a viable user group.

you may also like

More Stories

Recipes We