Living Well

Aging Well

Hispanics Live Longer Than Whites

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One in every six people in the U.S. is Hispanic/Latino and as a group they live longer than non-Hispanic whites -- 81.4 years vs. 78.8 years. Yet despite their strong representation and relative longevity, little is understood about this group's health conditions and behaviors, according to a release from Albert Einstein College of Medicine of the Yeshiva University in the Bronx, NY.

Aging Well

Restoring Strength in Aging Muscles

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A stem cell based method may restore strength to damaged skeletal muscles of the elderly, according to a study done at the University of Toronto and published in a February 2014 issue of the journal Nature Medicine describes. A release from the university notes that skeletal muscles are some of the most important muscles in the body, supporting functions such as sitting, standing, blinking and swallowing. In aging individuals, the function of these muscles significantly decreases.

Aging Well

With Age, Body Image Gets Better

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Boomers worry less about their appearance than Gen-Xers or Millenials do, according to a national online survey done by TODAY and AOL in February 2014. The results showed that 35% of Boomers aged 50 to 68 worry that people are judging their appearance, compared to 51% of Gen Xers aged 35 to 49 and 62% of millennials aged 16-34. Also, while 80% of women under age 24 worry about their appearance regularly, that number drops steadily with age. Among those who are 55+, 52% worry about appearance regularly.

Skin
Skin Health

Preventing and Treating Cellulite

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By Samira Zia Rehman When perusing through the shelves of anti-aging skin care products, you’ll probably notice that a significant number of them are dedicated to helping you get rid of cellulite. Although it isn’t harmful, cellulite is one of the most stubborn and embarrassing aesthetic issues to correct and, unfortunately, it only gets worse with age.

Aging Well
Senior Health
Stress Management
Stress-Free Living

Stress Hormone Linked to Frailty

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Low levels of cortisol in the morning and high levels in the evening are associated with declining grip strength and walking speed, which are indications of frailty in older adults. That is the finding of research done at Helmholtz Zentrum München in Neuherberg in Germany and published in the March 2014 issue of the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Aging Well

Older Women Self-Employed by Necessity

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Older women most often turn to self-employment because of financial need while older men typically choose self-employment. That is the sobering but not surprising finding of research done at the University of Missouri in Columbia. The study will be published in the Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare in March 2014.

Aging Well

Rejuvenated Stem Cells Help Aging Muscles Heal

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Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have pinpointed why normal aging is accompanied by a diminished ability to regain strength and mobility after muscle injury: Over time, stem cells within muscle tissues dedicated to repairing damage become less able to generate new muscle fibers and struggle to self-renew.

Aging Well

CareBox to Help You Age in Place

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A highly sensitive alarm unit called the CareBox, which will be available toward the end of 2014, can immediately call  family members, neighbors, or caregivers by telephone, cell phone, or the Internet when someone in the home falls or is otherwise in need of assistance. A release from Fraunhofer, the German research company that created the device, notes that an estimated 30 percent of people over 65 years of age lwho live at home fall at least once a year. For those over 80 years old, more than 40 percent take a tumble annually.

Aging Well
Well-being

Feeling in Control Can Increase Longevity

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People who feel in control and believe they can achieve goals despite hardships are more likely to live longer and healthier lives, especially among those with less education, according to a study by Brandeis University and the University of Rochester and published online in the Journal of Health Psychology. Previous studies have shown that people with a high school diploma or less education tend to die younger than those with a college degree or graduate training. Yet, that’s not a hard and fast rule. Why? 

Money Matters

Hacking & ID Theft: Are You Next?

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By. Scott A. Merritt At least 110 million consumers were affected by the hack involving Target and Neiman Marcus and at least three other retailers. Whether or not millions more will have their identities manipulated and finances ruined within the coming months due to more breaches of security at other stores is anyone’s guess. 

Sex

7 Libido-Boosting Foods

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When it comes to getting in the mood, there's more at play than just Victoria's Secret and Viagra. Sex experts say one of the most important keys to having a healthy sex drive is the right diet. A balanced diet will not only help you look better and feel more confident, but will deliver key nutrients to keep your libido high. A poor diet could be causing you toxicity, inflammation, and sluggishness, none of which will help stir your passion.

Aging Well

Enjoy Life and Be Healthier

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When it comes to a positive attitude and the quality of life in older age, there really is a connection, according to a new study. Researchers whose findings were published in the CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) found that the benefits of enjoying life include faster walking speeds and better physical function in daily activities. The  investigators looked at 3,199 men and women aged 60 or over who were residents of England.

Aging Well

Sun Exposure May Help Lower Blood Pressure

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Exposure to sunlight has a newly found health benefit: reducing blood pressure and cutting the risk of heart attack and stroke, according to a new study.   The findings, published in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology, indicate that sunlight alters the level of nitric oxide (NO), a small messenger molecule, in skin and blood.   Martin Feelisch, Professor of Experimental Medicine and Integrative Biology at the University of Southampton, UK, comments: “NO along with its breakdown products, known to

Brain Health
Mental & Emotional Health
Stress Management
Stress-Free Living

Nature’s Balm for the Stressed Brain

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New findings on nociception, a system in the brain that naturally moderates the effects of stress, shows promise for the development of therapies for anxiety and addiction. Collaborating scientists at The Scripps Research Institute, the National Institutes of Health, and the University of Camerino in Italy published their results in the January 8th in the Journal of Neuroscience.

Skin
Skin Health

The Ultimate Anti-Aging Protection?

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Researchers have identified a substance that can offer total protection against some types of sun damage, and that may lead to skin looking younger for longer. Scientists from Newcastle University focused on the antioxidant Tiron, which targets mitochondria, known as the “batteries” of the skin cells. Comparing the types of mitochondria-targeting antioxidants with other antioxidants such as resveratrol and circumin, they found that the most powerful mitochondria-targeting antioxidant was Tiron.  

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